Laetiporus Cincinnatus 01

This fungus Laetiporus cincinnatus is one of the varieties of “the chicken mushroom” (or “chicken of the woods”), so-called because of its stringy flesh and the perception by some fungus eaters of a chicken-like taste. This species often grows at the base of a live oak tree and sometimes separately but parasitic on the tree’s roots. The caps are shelf-like and form rosettes.

This specimen was discovered on an upland surface at the slope break between metamorphosed volcanic rocks and sedimentary rocks in the Uwharrie National Forest of North Carolina.

All images ©Andy R. Bobyarchick.
Reference

Kuo, Michael, 2018, Laetiporus cincinnatus, http://www.mushroomexpert.com/laetiporus_cincinnatus.html, accessed 24 June 2018.

Amanita section Lepidella in Uwharrie National Forest, NC

These are images of mushrooms from the Uwharrie National Forest in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The fungi are from the genus Amanita (Basidiomycetes > Agaricales > Amanitaceae). The bulbous stem base and other features put these in Amanita section Lepidella. I have not attempted to determine a species. These are relatively young. When mature, they will have a characteristic mushroom shape with gills.

The Amanita are very common in North Carolina. Some are edible but some are also deadly, and the variants are hard to identify. The caps of these specimens have not opened yet. Early on, they may look like puffballs, but a cross-section (see one of the images below) will show the developing mushroom shape. These particular mushrooms have swollen, bulbous stem bases that are conjoined. The stem and base are somewhat shaggy. The caps are covered by dense warts. These species do not discolor when bruised (some Amanita do), have a mild scent, and a dense flesh like bread dough.

All of the images you see here are from a relatively small area under a hardwood, mainly oak, cover and in very rocky soil. As usual, I discovered these specimens on the way to doing something else, in this case geologic mapping but I expected to see many fungi because it was June, peak season, and not long after heavy rain. Enjoy the mini-tour.

All images ©Andy R. Bobyarchick.